Skeleton Games

Osteoarchaeology, archaeology, and pretending to be an adult.

Mysteries of medieval graffiti in England's churches

archaeologicalnews:

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Medieval graffiti of straw kings, pentagrams, crosses, ships and “demon traps” have been offering a tantalising glimpse into England’s past. What do the pictures reveal about life in the Middle Ages?

A project to record the graffiti, which began in Norfolk, has now been rolled out to other…

An unaccompanied child migrant was the first person in line on opening day of the new immigration station at Ellis Island. Her name was Annie Moore, and that day, January 1, 1892, happened to be her 15th birthday. She had traveled with her two little brothers from Cork County, Ireland, and when they walked off the gangplank, she was awarded a certificate and a $10 gold coin for being the first to register. Today, a statue of Annie stands on the island, a testament to the courage of millions of children who passed through those same doors, often traveling without an older family member to help them along.

Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

archaeologicalnews:

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It remained a mystery for decades.

Since archaeologist F.Ll. Griffith’s excavations in the 1920’s at the ancient site of the pharaoh Akhenaten’s short-lived new capital city of Akhetaten (modern Amarna), archaeologists have been puzzled about the whereabouts of the remains of the city’s…

deservetoberescued:

St Leonard’s Church Crypt in Hythe, Kent.

Just incredible.

The skull with the side missing has a birds nest in. Vandals broke windows into the crypts and birds got in. One decided to nest within the skull.

(via valdanderthal)

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com


I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.
Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

www.care2.com

I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.

Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

(via anthrocentric)

corporisfabrica:

The earliest known prosthesis, a toe from ancient Egypt. Dating back to the period 950 to 710 B.C.E, this wooden toe once belonged to an Egyptian noblewoman and would have assisted in walking, as well as contributing aesthetically. 

corporisfabrica:

The earliest known prosthesis, a toe from ancient Egypt. 
Dating back to the period 950 to 710 B.C.E, this wooden toe once belonged to an Egyptian noblewoman and would have assisted in walking, as well as contributing aesthetically. 

(via jangojips)

Skull-donation mystery leads others to turn in human remains | Latest News | The Seattle Times

strangeremains:

Quite a few people apparently have skeletons in their closets.

The disclosure earlier this month that someone had anonymously dropped three human skulls into a Goodwill donation bin in Bellevue has touched off an unexpected rush by others to turn in human remains, according to the King County Medical Examiner’s Office.

The skulls dropped off in Bellevue — two clinical skulls used for educational purposes and the skull of a Native American child — prompted the Medical Examiner’s Office to turn to the public for help.

The source of the skulls has yet to be determined, but three other people have turned in human bones, according to King County forensic anthropologist Kathy Taylor.

One set of bones consisted of clinical remains, or the type that are bleached and wired together for medical or educational purposes. The other two were Native American bones that by state law must be repatriated to their tribes.

Read more at the Seattle Times