Skeleton Games

Osteoarchaeology, archaeology, and pretending to be an adult.
theolduvaigorge:

Obstacles to Career Progression in Archaeology: Precarious Labour and Unemployment
by Samuel Andrew Hardy
As Sue Hamilton brought out, a combination of personal and structural forces harm workers and areas of work. Those forces multiply inequity by channelling already disadvantaged workers into disadvantageous areas of work. For example, under a historic ‘domestic’ division of labour in archaeology, women have disproportionately performed invisible ‘dishwashing’ duties, which have not only been immediately financially under-rewarding and relatively insecure, but which have also undermined career progression by requiring under-recognised labour such as collection cataloguing (Dommasnes, Kleppe, Mandt and Næss, 1998: 119; see also Bolger, 2003: 207 – tables 8.2–8.3; Webb and Frankel, 1995: 101; Karouzou, 1984: 27, translated and cited by Nikolaidou and Kokkinidou, 1998: 248)” (read more/open access).
(Open access source: Papers from the Institute of Archaeology 24(1):21, 2014; image: Succinct Research)

theolduvaigorge:

Obstacles to Career Progression in Archaeology: Precarious Labour and Unemployment

  • by Samuel Andrew Hardy

As Sue Hamilton brought out, a combination of personal and structural forces harm workers and areas of work. Those forces multiply inequity by channelling already disadvantaged workers into disadvantageous areas of work. For example, under a historic ‘domestic’ division of labour in archaeology, women have disproportionately performed invisible ‘dishwashing’ duties, which have not only been immediately financially under-rewarding and relatively insecure, but which have also undermined career progression by requiring under-recognised labour such as collection cataloguing (Dommasnes, Kleppe, Mandt and Næss, 1998: 119; see also Bolger, 2003: 207 – tables 8.2–8.3; Webb and Frankel, 1995: 101; Karouzou, 1984: 27, translated and cited by Nikolaidou and Kokkinidou, 1998: 248)” (read more/open access).

(Open access source: Papers from the Institute of Archaeology 24(1):21, 2014; image: Succinct Research)

theolduvaigorge:

Scurvy in a tropical paradise? Evaluating the possibility of infant and adult vitamin C deficiency in the Lapita skeletal sample of Teouma, Vanuatu, Pacific islands

  • by Hallie R. Buckley, Rebecca Kinaston, Siân E. Halcrow, Aimee Foster, Matthew Spriggs and Stuart Bedford

The Neolithic colonisation of the Pacific islands was one of the most challenging migration events in human history. The regions east of the Solomon Islands were colonised relatively recently by a people known as the Lapita. The Lapita brought with them a ‘transported landscape’ of domesticated plants and animals that had to be established upon arrival for the survival of these fledgling communities. Colonisation of these previously uninhabited islands was potentially perilous, and could leave colonisers vulnerable to periods of resource stress. The largest cemetery sample of Lapita people from the site of Teouma in Vanuatu offers a unique opportunity to assess the impact of colonisation on the health of pioneering populations. This paper explores the possibility that Teouma people experienced vitamin C deficiency as one of the consequences of the agricultural subsistence practices during the initial phases of island colonisation. Skeletal lesions in infants and adults indicative of scurvy suggest that initial colonisation phases in the Pacific islands involved precarious times involving deficiencies of key nutrients. Colonisation of the Pacific islands may share similar frameworks and problems as periods of subsistence transition in other parts of the world” (read more/open access).

(Open access source: International Journal of Paleopathology 5:72-85, 2104 via Academia.edu)

(via valdanderthal)

oosik:

Metapodial Pathology

I’m helping pack up the zooarchaeological collection at my school. We don’t have too much in the way of pathologies, but today I found this caribou metapodial. It appears the animal may have suffered an ugly break, but was able to heal the bone long before death. The sulcus on the posterior face of the metapodial includes abnormal plumbing with small foramena that could have allowed for a unique blood flow passage created during the healing process.

(via valdanderthal)

stereoculturesociety:

CultureHISTORY: Tommie Smith and John Carlos, Olympics 1968

“We were just human beings who saw a need to bring attention to the inequality in our country.” - Tommie Smith

On this date (10/16) in 1968, the ‘black power’ salute at the Summer Olympics in Mexico City. One of my favorite historical photos and one of the most powerful moments in black history. More background here.

Photo credits:

  1. Summer Olympics, Mexico City, 1968
  2. Summer Olympics, Mexico City, 1968
  3. San Jose State University honors former students Smith & Carlos with a statue on campus, 2005
  4. Smith and Carlos, 2011

texantforimage:

teeth of an adult male. Notice the maxiloavleolar laminae of maxila and mandible and the tooth wear of incisiors

theolduvaigorge:

Neanderthal Infant and Adult Infracranial Remains from Marillac (Charente, France)

  • by María Dolores Garralda, Bruno Maureille and Bernard Vandermeersch

"At the site of Marillac, near the Ligonne River in Marillac-le-Franc (Charente, France), a remarkable stratigraphic sequence has yielded a wealth of archaeological information, palaeoenvironmental data, as well as faunal and human remains. Marillac must have been a sinkhole used by Neanderthal groups as a hunting camp during MIS 4 (TL date 57,600 6 4,600BP), where Quina Mousterian lithics and fragmented bones of reindeer predominate. This article describes three infracranial skeleton fragments. Two of them are from adults and consist of the incomplete shafts of a right radius (Marillac 24) and a left fibula (Marillac 26). The third fragment is the diaphysis of the right femur of an immature individual (Marillac 25), the size and shape of which resembles those from Teshik-Tash and could be assigned to a child of a similar age. The three fossils have been compared with the remains of other Neanderthals or anatomically Modern Humans (AMH). Furthermore, the comparison of the infantile femora, Marillac 25 and Teshik-Tash, with the remains of several European children from the early Middle Ages clearly demonstrates the robustness and rounded shape of both Neanderthal diaphyses. Evidence of peri-mortem manipulations have been identified on all three bones, with spiral fractures, percussion pits and, in the case of the radius and femur, unquestionable cutmarks made with flint implements, probably during defleshing. Traces of periostosis appear on the fibula fragment and on the immature femoral diaphysis, although their aetiology remains unknown" (read more/not open access).

(Source: American Journal of Physical Anthropology 155(1):99-113, 2014)