Skeleton Games

Osteoarchaeology, archaeology, and pretending to be an adult.

Screencap Meme
Post a screencap of your current desktop.
Rule: Once you’ve been tagged you can’t change your desktop even if it’s embarrassing.

Tagged by valdanderthal and jangojips.
90% of the time I couldn’t even tell you what my background is…I pay so little attention to it. So, luckily this isn’t really embarrassing (though some of you might not know about my ventures into anime…so, surprise??) .
I got tagged in this forever ago, so I’m not sure who else has already done it, so…
dead-men-talking, mortavita, cmedinburgh, strangeremains, zomganthro, theolduvaigorge, theladygoogle and anyone else who feels up to it.

Screencap Meme

Post a screencap of your current desktop.

Rule: Once you’ve been tagged you can’t change your desktop even if it’s embarrassing.

Tagged by valdanderthal and jangojips.

90% of the time I couldn’t even tell you what my background is…I pay so little attention to it. So, luckily this isn’t really embarrassing (though some of you might not know about my ventures into anime…so, surprise??) .

I got tagged in this forever ago, so I’m not sure who else has already done it, so…

dead-men-talking, mortavita, cmedinburgh, strangeremains, zomganthro, theolduvaigorge, theladygoogle and anyone else who feels up to it.

rorschachx:

A skeleton of a humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) lies near the Comandante Ferraz base, in Antarctica. The skeleton was placed in 1972 by French researcher and scientist Jacques Cousteau as a memorial againts the killing of this species in the 20th century | image by Vanderlei Almeida

rorschachx:

A skeleton of a humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) lies near the Comandante Ferraz base, in Antarctica. The skeleton was placed in 1972 by French researcher and scientist Jacques Cousteau as a memorial againts the killing of this species in the 20th century | image by Vanderlei Almeida

(via theolduvaigorge)

possumtours:

This brick outside the WWII museum caught my eye. I decided to think about Eddie Simpson. I didn’t think I’d ever learn, but a few moments on the life of a forgotten serviceman, a faceless name, couldn’t hurt. I took a picture of the name, thought about it as I walked to the car, thought about him, Eddie Simpson, as I drove home. “There had to have been more than one Edward Simpson,” I thought.I googled the exact quote from the brick and found that a man, WIlliam Overstreet, who, in 1944, flew under the arches of the Eiffel tower to shoot down a German plane had died in December, 2013. William Overstreet. WBO.A few google searches with both names lead me to Eddie Simpson’s story. After walking away from the crash of his P-51 Mustang, Simpson died to save the lives of French Resistance fighters; men and women he barely knew and with whom he could not converse.  Read: The Stars and Stripes account of Eddie Simpson’s last day.I remember Eddie Simpson.

possumtours:

This brick outside the WWII museum caught my eye. I decided to think about Eddie Simpson. I didn’t think I’d ever learn, but a few moments on the life of a forgotten serviceman, a faceless name, couldn’t hurt. 

I took a picture of the name, thought about it as I walked to the car, thought about him, Eddie Simpson, as I drove home. “There had to have been more than one Edward Simpson,” I thought.

I googled the exact quote from the brick and found that a man, WIlliam Overstreet, who, in 1944, flew under the arches of the Eiffel tower to shoot down a German plane had died in December, 2013. William Overstreet. WBO.

A few google searches with both names lead me to Eddie Simpson’s story. After walking away from the crash of his P-51 Mustang, Simpson died to save the lives of French Resistance fighters; men and women he barely knew and with whom he could not converse.  

Read: The Stars and Stripes account of Eddie Simpson’s last day.

I remember Eddie Simpson.

(via greatestgeneration)

supernatasha:

The Barefoot College in Tilonia, Rajasthan was started by an Indian man named Bunker Roy. The organization is essentially a college that teaches women from all over the world (but primarily “developing” countries) how to be solar engineers. 

That’s right. Solar engineers.

Classes are attended by local women and women from Peru, Fiji, Rwanda, Nepal, Belize, Ethiopia, Bhutan, and more who are illiterate or semi-literate. Most of them are from rural and poverty-stricken areas. The school does not take attendance, have exams, demand their students speak English or have prior education, and does not ask for fees. These women learn how to make solar panels and bulbs, how to plug them into an electrical grid, and how to provide clean renewable energy to their entire village. They then take this knowledge back to their hometowns in distant countries. 

How are they taught without a common language? Everything technical is color coded. The women learn important words “LED, wire cutter, copper, connection, etc.” They communicate through common sense and the desire to learn. The college accepts anyone and everyone, mothers, lower castes (still an ongoing problem in India), older women, young women, women who have never attended school, married women. 

Since 2004, the College has taught at least 250 women from 41 different low-industrial countries to be solar engineers. 5 out of their 8 engineer professors are women. 35 out of 200 workers are physically disabled. The BC is currently powering both their own facility, homes in nearby villages and towns, and their former students are powering homes all across the world from wisdom and materials imported from the BC. Their local villages pay their salary. 

Roy did try to teach both men and women, but they didn’t stay in the harsh conditions or wanted jobs that paid more (as the BC doesn’t hand out “official” diplomas or degrees). Eventually, the college became largely female. "Why not invest in women, older women, mature women, gutsy women who have roots in the village?" Roy said.

I cannot emphasize how amazing this organization is. The Barefoot College is a safe and accepting place for anyone who wants to learn about clean and renewable energy. It encourages women’s empowerment, helps them out of poverty, and provides solar energy to places where the prices of kerosene and batteries are excessively high.

Sources (please look over them as there are more pictures and I could never do justice to how incredible this entire thing is with just my own words): [x][x][x][x][x][Bunker’s Ted Talk][Donate]

(via scientific-women)

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, Horned Gopher. Horned gophers are the smallest known mammals to ever have horns, and the only known species of horned rodents.
© The Field Museum, CSGEO77569.
Skull Horned Gopher (Ceratogaulus hatcheri), Pliocene. Nebraska.
8x10 negative
1933

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, Horned Gopher. Horned gophers are the smallest known mammals to ever have horns, and the only known species of horned rodents.

© The Field Museum, CSGEO77569.

Skull Horned Gopher (Ceratogaulus hatcheri), Pliocene. Nebraska.

8x10 negative

1933

specios:

About a week ago, I found a pretty cool auction lot on eBay but the skulls had to be collected in person. A few days later, I won that auction. Yesterday, I went to pick up my newest editions - the large buck skull, the single antler and the large hind skull. The two other skulls in the photo - the fallow doe and the roe buck - were already mine, but make for a nice comparison between the species.

The seller found these naturally cleaned whilst walking their dog and honestly seemed to not have much of a clue about what they were. I gave them a little scrub and they were still wet in the photos. I can’t get over how big the red deer hind is; she dwarfs my fallow doe, and the roe buck looks like a fawn in comparison.

I’m not entirely sure what that buck skull is - by the size I was guessing it was a fallow deer like my doe, but there is a noticeable size difference between them that I can’t ignore. I’ll need to look into this further in order to get an accurate identification.

(via prettydeadstuff)

ancientart:

The stone ships of Anundshög, which date from approximately the 1st century. Anundshög is the largest tumulus in Sweden, and is located in Västmanland. 

Photos taken by Britt-Marie Sohlström.