Skeleton Games

The archaeological adventures of an osteoarchaeology postgrad.

anthropologyadventures:

I found a good example of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) in my cranial sample today. LEH is a developmental complication in which the regular growth of dental enamel is interrupted due to physiological stress. This interruption results in horizontal lines across the teeth. One example of a physiological stressor on developing individuals that may cause LEH would be a period of food shortage.

This individual exhibited two distinct hypoplastic bands across the anterior teeth, which may suggest more than one significant period of stress.

iowaarchaeology:

Spring reminds us that it’s almost time to get out on the water! Beginning at the end of May, we’ll be partnering with the Iowa DNR to offer archaeology-themed paddle tours of Iowa’s water trails. We’ll keep you posted on how to find out about them!
This approximately 300 year old, walnut dugout canoe was discovered in 1975 along the East Nishnabotna River near Red Oak in Montgomery County. Through the coordinated efforts of the OSA and Montgomery County Historical Society, the canoe is now on renewable loan to the Montgomery County History Center in Red Oak.

iowaarchaeology:

Spring reminds us that it’s almost time to get out on the water! Beginning at the end of May, we’ll be partnering with the Iowa DNR to offer archaeology-themed paddle tours of Iowa’s water trails. We’ll keep you posted on how to find out about them!

This approximately 300 year old, walnut dugout canoe was discovered in 1975 along the East Nishnabotna River near Red Oak in Montgomery County. Through the coordinated efforts of the OSA and Montgomery County Historical Society, the canoe is now on renewable loan to the Montgomery County History Center in Red Oak.

lunacylover:

Ostrów Lednicki is one of the most important archaeological sites concerning the early history of Poland.

Located in an island in the southern portion of Lake Lednica between the cities of Gniezno and Poznań - in the heart of early Slavonic Polanie tribe - it’s a place where a gród (gord - medieval Slavonic fortified settlement) was built and existed around the 10th-11th centuries, at the times when early Poland started to take a shape. Originally the island was connected with the land by a long platform bridge (very characteristic for the architecture of the West Slavs), currently the only way to get to the island is to use a ferryboat. Existing ruins of a chapel, church and palace, thought to be the home of the first Kings of the Piast dynasty and a supposed place of the king Mieszko’s baptism, have been roofed over for preservation. Today the ruins are of archaeological significance, and the site of the Museum of the Piast Dynasty, opened in 1969.

Sources: [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x]. Check out other Slavic settlements.

// In Polish: do obejrzenia “Wyspa Władców" i do pobrania "Studia Lednickie"- czasopismo naukowe Muzeum Pierwszych Piastów na Lednicy

dead-men-talking:

American alligator proximal pedal phalanges resemble human finger bones: diagnostic criteria for forensic investigators

Authors: Joseph V. Ferraro and Katie M. Binetti

Forensic Science International, 2014

A scientific approach to bone and tooth identification requires analysts to pursue the goal of empirical falsification. That is, they may attribute a questioned specimen to element and taxon only after having ruled out all other possible attributions. This requires analysts to possess a thorough understanding of both human and nonhuman osteology, particularly so for remains that may be morphologically similar across taxa. To date, forensic anthropologists have identified several potential ‘mimics’ for human skeletal remains, including pig teeth and bear paws. Here we document another possible mimic for isolated human skeletal elements – the proximal pedal phalanges of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) closely resemble the proximal and intermediate hand phalanges of adult humans. We detail morphological similarities and differences between these elements, with the goal of providing sufficient information for investigators to confidently falsify the hypothesis that a questioned phalanx is derived from an American alligator.

(Source: ac.els-cdn.com, via valdanderthal)

smithsonianlibraries:

Save the date - next week is Preservation Week, and to celebrate, our book conservator @moonlightbinder is doing an #AMA right here on tumblr! 
Ever wondered why using tape on a book is a no-no? Or how you can “wash” a book? This AMA is for you.
Submit questions to our Ask in advance or on the day - Wednesday, April 30th. We’ll be answering questions throughout the day (well, 9-5 EST)  and Katie will be live from noon until 2pm EST.

smithsonianlibraries:

Save the date - next week is Preservation Week, and to celebrate, our book conservator @moonlightbinder is doing an #AMA right here on tumblr! 

Ever wondered why using tape on a book is a no-no? Or how you can “wash” a book? This AMA is for you.

Submit questions to our Ask in advance or on the day - Wednesday, April 30th. We’ll be answering questions throughout the day (well, 9-5 EST)  and Katie will be live from noon until 2pm EST.

(via smithsonian)

ancientart:

Ancient post-it notes!

romkids:

How often do you reach for a Post-It note? Maybe you’re making that to do list, or figuring out your groceries. But you know, what if you lived BEFORE Post-It notes or scrap paper? What would you use then?

In Thebes, where these examples are from, and across the Roman Empire, scraps of used and broken pottery would be used to scribble quick notes. These examples are called ostraka. Most of the ostraka that our conservators and curators are studying right now contain notes on taxes and granary receipts from the second century AD.

The notes are written in Greek script. Kay Sunahara, ROM archaeologist studying these pieces, described the Greek langage at the time as, “the lingua franca of the Mediterranean”. Greek was the most frequently used written language, used to help bridge the gap between speakers of different languages, much like English today.

The majority of these pieces we’re found and acquired in the early 1900’s by none other than ROM founder Charles T. Currelly.

So how are these scrap pieces of pottery useful to archaeology today? Are grocery lists really that vaulabe? For archaeologists, ostraka provide them with a great deal of information about the people who left these notes in the first place. Information such as what people were eating, trading for, in trouble for, and the prices of things, give us a unique look into those who lived far before us, in this case well over a thousand years ago.

Interestingly enough, it also shows us just how similar we are to those who lived long before. Everyone needs groceries, and a reminder letter, maybe from their mom, or from their husband, of what to get from the store.

National Archaeology Day takes place on October 20th at the ROM and many other museums around the world!

(via zomganthro)